Carson McCullers

I’m still reading our current book, “The Heart is a Lonely Hunter”, so before I complete the post for that book, I thought in the meantime I would give you a teaser post about Carson McCullers, the author.

The American author Carson McCullers was born in Georgia in 1917 and lived most of her life in the American south and New York.  She wrote almost exclusively about the south and focused heavily on the themes of loneliness and the power of love.  Many critics, including the Modern Library, consider “The Heart is a Lonely Hunter” to be her masterpiece, which she wrote at the age of 23.  McCullers suffered from poor health for much of her life caused by rheumatic fever and a series of strokes, and she died in New York at age 50.  A Hollywood film is currently being made about McCullers’ life.

It may be of interest to those who live in Brooklyn, that McCullers lived communally for a while in the February House, an informal literary salon located in Brooklyn Heights.  A series of writers and artists frequented the Brooklyn Brownstone that housed the February
House, including W.H. Auden, Richard Wright and even, Salvador Dali.  The house was demolished in the early 1940s to make way for the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway.

McCullers’ work inspired Susan Vega to write a musical homage to her.

CBS – Feature

Suzanne Vega, Talks About Love

Here are some other links about Carson McCullers that may be of interest.

New York Times Archives

Wikipedia – Carson McCullers

Any and all comments welcome!

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About 100greatnovels

In 1998 the Modern Library published a list of the 100 best novels of the 20th Century. http://www.modernlibrary.com/top-100/100-best-novels/ This blog is to function as an online book-club to discuss the books included on this list. Please feel free to leave comments regarding your thoughts on the novel examined in each post. PS. Please ignore the Reader's List. This blog focusses on the Board's List (at least for the time being).
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